Friday, January 22, 2016

The Color Bar Fetish -- A Shot of White Noise & Violent Girl - Rarities "Albums"



UPDATED FOR 2021!
 
Elliott Smith was a prolific artist who had a surprising amount of songs that he had recorded, but never released. There have been many leaks over the years, and there are still more songs that have never been heard. These two compilations collect 44 tracks that are either b-sides (officially released only on a single, an EP, or a reissue) or they are leaked material that never made it onto an album.

The first rarities compilation after Elliott’s death was New Moon, which was released in 2007. It was a collection of songs that had been left on the cutting room floor from throughout his career. Each one of the compilations in this collection has nearly as many songs as New Moon. That is to say that part of the idea behind the creation of A Shot of White Noise and Violent Girl was to create two more New Moons.
 
These songs were recorded from 1995-2003, spanning Elliott's career as a solo artist. However, they aren’t organized chronologically, but are constructed to make sense as a whole. The idea was to give the flow and feel of an official album, with its own listening arc. Each tracklist is also made so that they mirror and play off of one another. It is also intended to follow the
"Color Bar Fetish" idea that you can read more about in the post below. 

The first collection, A Shot of White Noise, is more acoustic, and the second, Violent Girl, has more electric guitar and more instruments in the arrangements. One is more raw and melodic and meditative, with the other being a bit more composed and playful or aggressive. They are two juxtaposing mixes to capture Elliott’s juxtaposing sides.
 
And check out my other post about Heatmiser, which can be found here.
 

 

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(Lossless files are included where possible, other lossy formats remain from their original leaks. All files are from original sources with no transcoding or editing. Please do not transcode/convert or edit these files when sharing.) 

 


 
A Shot of White Noise
 
 
A Shot of White Noise:
1. Let's Turn the Record Over
2.  Some Song
3.  Place Pigalle
4.  Taking a Fall
5.  Crazy Fucker (Another Standard Folk Song)
6.  No Name # 6  
7.  I Don't Think I'm Ever Gonna Figure It Out
8.  True Love  
9. Grand Mal
10. No Confidence Man
11. Misery Let me Down
12. Instrumental (Waltz #3)
13.  Stickman (Acoustic) 
14.  Ceclila-Amanda
15.  You Make It Seem Like Nothing
16.  My New Freedom
17.  Everything’s Ok
18.  Sorry My Mistake
19.  Stained Glass Eyes
20.  No More
21.  Trouble (Cat Stevens Cover)
22.  Figure 8
 
Violent Girl:
1.  Division Day
2.  Some (Rock) Song  
3.  A Living Will  
4.  How to Take a Fall
5.  Dancing on the Highway
6.  Suicide Machine
7. I Figured You Out
8.  I Can't Answer You Anymore
9.  Abused
10.  Flowers for Charlie
11.  Miss Misery
12.  Our Thing (Instrumental)
13.  Stickman
14. The Enemy Is You
15.  Mr. Goodmorning
16.  Brand New Game
17. From the Poisoned Well
18.  The Real Estate (The Mailman Thinks Me Dumb)
19.  Burned Out, Still Glowing
20.  No Life
21.  Splitsville
22.  Because (Beatles Cover)
 
*Track info - version, recording and release - here


 
 
 
 

 

THE COLOR BAR FETISH

 

A Story of Sad Sack Masculinity 

in a Suicide Machine


A Shot of White Noise is a lyric from "Crazy Fucker" (also called "Another Standard Folk Song"). The track starts off in the middle of a recording session where a disappointed Elliott has already finished a song and says, "That wasn't such a good version of that..." When he gets singing, the refrain is, "Arrow, come pick me out." Arrow is the name of the daughter of Autumn De Wilde, Elliott's photographer friend (I first created these mixes after reading De Wilde's book of photographs of Elliott). For me, this line conjures the scene of a little girl and Elliott Smith playing some made up kid's game together. Although, of course, the song is mostly about picking a fight with a "crazy fucker from the south." I like to see the song as putting on display Elliott's contrasting character, as a guy with a big inner child who also gets into bar fights. His songs aren't afraid to be emotionally vulnerable and honest, but his career was haunted by the brand of a "sad singer." There's another side to the music and to the man that often gets overlooked. This juxtaposition is what I tried to capture between these two mixes.

The second "record," Violent Girl represents the more playful and aggressive side. The songs are more upbeat and have more instruments and fuller arrangements. The title comes from "Some (Rock) Song," and the lyric, "I want a violent girl who's not afraid of anything." 
 
It's an interesting song, because there's another, acoustic and quieter version of it that I put on A Shot of White Noise that has one lyrical difference. In "Some Song" the double vocals can hide the line to make it seem like, "How they beat you up, week after week." But in "Some (Rock) Song," he clearly says, "Charlie beat you up week after week." Charlie was Elliott's step-father when he was growing up in Texas and, as one could gather from the lyric, they didn't have the best relationship. This account of abuse also comes up in another song, "No Confidence Man," from 1994, with the lyrics: "Charlie's got a band in his hand. A rubber loop..." This could maybe shed some light on the song "Crazy Fucker." The bad memories from Texas could be the reason why our narrator was picking a fight with someone just because they were from the south.
 
A leaked song Elliott wrote anywhere between 1986 and 1993, called "Where I Get it From," stuck with him for a long time. It has a little southern twang to it that musically references Texas and the lyrics show Elliott pondering his behaviors and if he inherited them from his family. During his work on a new album that he would never finish from 2000-2003, Elliott ended up resurrecting songs he had written years and years before and re-arranging them. Elliott apparently recorded the song under the title "I Don't Give a Fuck" (the track has never leaked). The title, as a placeholder maybe, could reveal what went on in Elliott's head when he was writing these songs about his past - or maybe it reveals more about his sense of humor. It's this type of conflict and complexity that's ever-present in his music and probably one of the biggest reasons why his music draws people in so intensely.

We can never really know what type of abuse Elliott suffered, but it's obvious that it affected his deeply.  Elliott seems to have channeled everything into his music and that's one of the best things about it. A big reason why Roman Candle is one of my favorite albums is the cryptic narrative about a complicated family situation. The story of what's going on in that record isn't crystal clear, but I don't think it's meant to be. I think the most helpful way to understand Elliott's lyrics is not to look at them as literal or autobiographical, but instead to look at them for the emotional truths they reveal.
 
It seems that Elliott always had a level of uncertainty about how much to reveal in his music. As Joanna Bolme attests in the documentary Heaven Adores You, he changed around the words a lot. It's difficult to assume facts about  his life or relationships from his lyrics, because he wrote about a lot of things that didn't reflect his reality. His drug use is a good example of that.
 
For instance, his self-titled album that was released in 1995 mentions heroin a lot, but it was apparently before he started using. A lot of his close friends attest to that in Heaven Adores You. The references are used like a literary device. So, "The White Lady" becomes a character and there are poetic turns of phrase from, "Your arm's got a death in it," in "Single File," to "Your cold white brother riding your blood like spun glass in sore eyes" in "Coming Up Roses." So, we're not literally talking about heroin, but instead we're maybe talking about emotional impulses, like escapism and self-destruction or self-sabotage. Something that simultaneously helps and hurts you.

Elliott might not have ever expected anyone to hear Roman Candle. It was just by chance that his girlfriend at the time showed it to Slim Moon of Kill Rock Stars and they put it out unedited, exactly as it was in 1994. That's the reason why I find the songs so interesting, because they probably weren't written with an audience in mind and also probably weren't revised and possibly self-censored as what might have happened with a more formal release.
 
Roman Candle era

Elliott has said in interviews that when he played heavy rock with his first band Heatmiser, it was only because he thought no one would want to listen to what he really had inside him. The time period when he started trying to make it in the music industry was immediately after the grunge tsunami of the early '90s following the explosion of popularity of Nirvana. I think the chance release of Roman Candle might have shown Elliott that another option was viable.
 
Elliott played a song live a few times in 1999 that is called "Flowers for Charlie." The Charlie in the song could be his step-father, but it could also be a reference to the Vietnam war. The communist supporters in Vietnam were called "Charlie." The song makes a lot of explicit war references and Elliott sings, "I'm not a good G.I. Joe" and "I won't fight you." The flowers in the song represent making peace with the other side, so part of the emotional truth of it could be Elliott trying to make peace with his memories of his step-father. Another way to understand the emotional truth is the internal conflict with aggression - the kind of aggression that's expected of a man and especially the kind that's expected of a hard rock musician. 
 
Elliott playing for the Academy Awards ceremony

Elliott exploded into national recognition with the film Good Will Hunting and a performance on the Oscars. It's a bad stroke of luck that the song that he put in the film which got nominated for an Oscar was titled "Miss Misery," because his music was constantly defined by misery and sadness by the media. Take a look at this interview (at 4:18). The interviewer asks him, "Are you a sad sack guy?" She clearly already has an idea what type of person Elliott is, or rather the person that she wants him to be for her story. 
 
One of Elliott's unreleased songs from around 2003 is called "Suicide Machine" and the refrain is, "Everybody's trying to turn me into a suicide machine." The idea is that he feels like he's being pushed into this suicide narrative. The interviewer immediately makes reference to Nick Drake and Kurt Cobain, two artists who supposedly died of suicide. Kurt Cobain specifically also talked about the pressure he felt around suicide and joining the "27 club" alongside other famous musicians who killed themselves or died at the age of 27, including Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and Jim Morrison. So, we can see how there is an already existing cut and paste story that this reporter is trying to stick onto Elliott (whether she intends to or not). Elliott was constantly frustrated by being pigeonholed by the media. 
 
The photography book published by Autumn de Wilde contains mountains of interviews with Elliott's friends that paint a drastically different picture of him. One example is how he would load 40 bucks into a jukebox to dominate it for a night and then fight anybody that tried to usurp his picks. Elliott also had a strong sense of humor. Take for example this moment at 7:07 in the short film made by Jem Cohen called Lucky Three. Elliott imitates a hard rock poster hanging on the wall behind him, and you really get a sense for the person Elliott was, making dumb jokes. Then there's Strange Parallel, another type of documentary short film in which Elliott replaces his hand with a robot hand. Or, take the opening line of "Color Bars" on Figure 8, "I see color bars when I come." Only Elliott could mask a sexual innuendo with just enough ambiguity to still seem poetic. 
 
Screenshot from Lucky 3

The robot hand from Strange Parallel

These moments also highlight one of the biggest overlooked reoccurring themes in Elliott's music: the hyper-masculine ideal in American culture. That first line of "Color Bars" paints an image of someone explicitly getting off to a test pattern, a colorful placeholder image specific to television and devoid of meaning. In Strange Parallel, the joke of giving him a robot hand recalls The Six Million Dollar Man as the mechanically created perfect human, which is used as a jab at the music industry. And in Lucky Three, there's another layer to Elliott mocking the hard rock poster. He got his start in a hard rock band, being Heatmiser, and he had very explicit opinions about the prevalence of macho rock.
 
Just a bit later in the previously mentioned interview Elliott makes a great point, when the interviewer asks "Would you say that it's more personal then, say, like, and Iron Maiden song?" Elliott responds, "If I was playing Iron Maiden songs, I would feel like that was extremely revealing." It's a personal joke that he finds thoroughly funny, but it doesn't seem to hit for the interviewer. Elliott is trying to say that the Iron Maiden type of masculinity reveals the deep seeded desire to prove one's manhood in flashy, ornamental ways like only glam metal can. Elliott just says, "it shows different things."
 
Iron Maiden in the 1990s

Elliott constantly tried to explain the function of sadness in his music, which could explain the function of sadness for human beings in general. In response to the question, why are you so sad?, he said, "I'm not 'so sad.' There has to be a certain amount of darkness in my songs for the happiness to matter. Just 'cause I'm not singing about sex and sports doesn't mean I'm sad." You could imagine that he had in mind a song from the '80s like ZZ Top's "Pearl Necklace."

In these types of interviews, Elliott seems to sort of get a kick out of being perceived as a depressive type, and in a very ironic way. In that same video again (at 9:05 with VH1), he's asked "Do you have any favorite tracks?" He responds, "I like the ones that are weird or more idosyncratic. Like this one called, 'Everything Means Nothing to Me.'" He pauses and give a suppressed little smirk, because he knows how she's going to respond. 
 
Already, the situation is surreal. Elliott doesn't seem like he belongs there at all. Here he is, sitting on a plush couch on a sleek, highly decorated set with a flat screen spinning graphics and logos beside him and a woman who you can tell is more used to interviewing Brittany Spears and N'Sync. So, of course, her response is awkward and hilarious and worth a watch. It also shows how mainstream culture doesn't know how to respond to a person like Elliott Smith, and how, in fact, his personality type is discouraged and repressed.
 
Elliott on VH1
 
The most interesting element for me about the media response to Elliott's music is the reflexive over-simplification and lack of any room for nuance. I think a lot of this has to do with cultural values when it comes to what our society expects from men. In one form or another, the cultural ideal for the American man is based on dominance. For example, men are expected to be strong and "cool," which also means emotionless. The contemporary gender theory is that gender is a performance. Gender isn't something that you just are, but something that you do. Men can only be men if they constantly prove their masculinity with actions. This plays out in over emphasized displays of manhood and can often translate into violence. For our purposes, it can also take the form of aggressive music. When someone doesn't conform to this idea of what a man is supposed to be, when a man shows his emotions for example or doesn't play the type of loud rock that's popular at the time, a new narrative logic has to be found that can resolve the conflict.
 
Elliott was very conscious of male gender roles and wrote about it in his music. In the song "Color Bars," he makes the connection between being pushed into a suicide machine and being a nonconformative man. He specifically names two male figures in the song, Sergeant Rock in the first verse and Bruno S in the second verse. 
 
Sgt. Rock (left) and Bruno Schleinstein (right)
 
Sergeant Rock is a character from DC Comics and is a World War II officer. He's a symbol of the heroic ideal American man, like G.I. Joe from "Flowers for Charlie." To really understand how Elliott felt about this type of man, take a look again at Strange Parallel (at 23:03) where Elliott is berated by one of his friends dressed as a drill sargeant. 
 
From Strange Parallel
 
Sergeant Rock is set up in contrast to Bruno S, full name Bruno Schleinstein. He was a German musician and actor famous for his roles in
Werner Herzgog movies, like Stroszek. Bruno S is not an example of a "perfect" man, for example, he spent time in mental institutions and doesn't conform to American body image standards. However, he could be accepted and adored as a German icon without a problem. Elliott asked, "How come we have no Bruno S here? . . . How come he can be a film star in Europe, but over here everybody has to look like they were computer generated?" As a side note, Bruno S. was also someone who was beaten as a child, which could be another reason why Elliott gravitated towards him. 
 
So in the song, Elliott has set up the conflict between these two male role models and calls out the obvious cultural preverence for the Sargeant Rock type. In the climax of "Color Bars," Elliott sings, "Everyone wants me to ride into the sun, but I ain't gonna go down!" Whether he knew it or not, Elliott drew a line between the way men are treated by society and the expectation of suicide for types of masculinity that don't conform. In this way, we can see how championing one type of man is also an act of attempted erasure of other types. This song also is one of a few great examples of Elliott explicitly stating that he has no intention to kill himself - that he refuses to go down the way they want him to.
 
Fame was another huge source of internal conflict for Elliott. In the first few minutes of Heaven Adores You, he says, "I'm the wrong kind of person to be really big and famous." On the surface, it would seem that he didn't want to be famous at all, and I'm sure he didn't, but something inside him pulled him in the opposite direction as well. He wrote a song for an EP by his friend Mary Lou Lorde, called "I Figured You Out" (It also appears on the 2017 anniversary edition of Either/Or sung by Elliott himself). The "you" in Elliott's lyrics is often himself, in the way that he's trying to have a conversation with himself. "I Figured You Out" is interesting, because it can be seen as being written from the woman's perspective in a relationship, so it's Elliott's criticism of himself as he sees himself from the outside. There's one line in it that is, "Your ambition and promise and your addiction to fame." It seems that Elliott was aware of his desire to be a well known, successful musician, and it weighed on him.

Elliott chose to put his music in movies and go on national television and move to L.A. and play on the Oscars. There's a moment in the Heaven Adores You that could be the instant that Elliott made that choice, when he went into a room alone with director Gus Van Sant. Gus knew that Elliott could get nominated for an Oscar, but only if "Miss Misery" was really a song composed specifically for Good Will Hunting. It wasn't, of course - Elliott had already been composing it on his own. They decided in that moment to just lie and say that it was indeed written for the film to get the nomination. Elliott must've felt the immense pressure to follow this narrative of success for a musician. The aforementioned line in "Color Bars," ("Everyone wants me to ride into the sun") could also be about fame. Riding into the sun like Icarus with his wax wings, getting too close and self-destructing. 
 
Elliott didn't lay most of the blame on the immensly powerful external influences on him, like the media, or the music industry, or society in general. He blamed himself, which is common for people who have been through abuse. In "Pictures of Me" on Either/Or, Elliott sings, "Flirting with the flicks, you say it's just for kicks. You'll be the victim of your own dirty tricks."

Another important aspect of this kind of gender theory is the idea that the masculine identity is acutally built on shame. Since masculinity can never really be obtained, there is always shame at not living up to the ideal. Our culture doesn't really teach us how to deal with shame. We're taught to achieve success and to rise to the top and we can only do that if we pretend our shame doesn't exist, until it eats us alive from the inside. Elliott's music is littered with self-deprecation and criticism and a sense of a lack of belonging. In "Some Song" he sings, "when you grow up you're gonna be a freak." In "Pitseleh" from XO, he sings, "I'm not half what I wish I was." Sociologist Michael Kimmel says that for people who are introverts, there is a recurring pattern of dealing with shame by self-medicating, "taking drugs, drinking, cutting themselves." And, of course, it's the same profile that is prone to suicide.

I'm not going to wade into the speculation about whether or not Elliott killed himself.
To this day, the official police investigation into the cause of death of Elliott Smith is still open. For me, what's more interesting is understanding the emotional truths and conflicts going on behind the music that those impulses symbolize. 

On the outside, Elliott had a lot of people who loved and supported him, and he knew that. At the apex of the song "King's Crossing" on From a Basement on the Hill,
the epic music swells and Elliott sings, "Give me one good reason not to do it...So, do it." The "it" here could easily be read as suicide. However, during some live performances with Elliott's friends, they would sing backing vocals and they followed this line with, "Because we love you." 
 
The idea of suicide is something that Elliott's lyrics constantly flirt with, but there's also strong examples against it. Maybe that self-destructive impulse represented giving up and giving in - to the behavior expected of a celebrity, or the tragic narrative expected for his music, or the pressure to be a specific type of man, or the addiction he had to drugs, or the trauma of his abuse. Maybe it was in his music as a reminder to keep on fighting.

In an interview with Carson Daily on MTV, Elliott explains the tattoo he has on his arm. He says, "It's a children's story, it's called Ferdinand. It's about a bull who doesn't want to go to the bull fight, but he does." The video is worth watching, because immediately afterward, Daily just stares vapidly for a second before saying, "That's awesome." 

The book, called The Story of Ferdinand, is by Munro Leaf and was published more than fifty years ago. It's about a bull that would much rather smell flowers and enjoy life than be forced into the arena for a bull fight. I think that sums it up pretty well for Elliott.



If you want to support Elliott Smith's memory and his family, donate to the sweetadeline.net memorial fund or go to killrockstars.com/elliotttsmith and buy a record.
 


 
 

Tracklist info:

A Shot of White Noise:
1. Let's Turn the Record Over
Version: Only released version
Recording info: Aug. 3 2000 - Jackpot! Studio in Portland, OR
First release: 2006 - Basement II Demos leak

2. Some Song
Version: No intro version
Recording Session: Sep. 1994 - Tony Lash's Home in Portland, OR
First release: 1998 - Ballad of Big Nothing Single

3. Place Pigalle
Version: Only released version
Recording Session: Jul. - Aug. 1999 - Capitol Recording in Los Angeles, CA
First release: 2007 - leak

4. Taking a Fall
Version: Only released version
Recording Session: Mar. 31 1998 - Jackpot! Studio in Portland, OR
First release: 2006 - Basement II Demos leak

5. Crazy Fucker (Another Standard Folk Song)
Version: "Studio version" 2020 - Elliott Smith Alternate Versions
Recording Session: 1994/5 - Unknown session
First release: 2006 - Basement II Demos leak

6. No Name # 6
Version: 1997 - Single version
Recording Session: Jun. - Jul. 1996 - Unknown location
First release: 1997 - Division Day Single

7. I Don't Think I'm Ever Gonna Figure It Out
Version: 2017 - Either/Or Expanded Remaster
Recording Session: Mar. - May 1995 - Unknown location
First release: 1995 - Speed Trials Single

8. True Love
Version: 2014 - Heaven Adores You Soundtrack
Recording Session: Jan. - Apr. 2001 - Two Beers & Everybody Sings in Los Angeles, CA
                                May 2001 - Spring 2002 - Satellite Park in Malibu, CA
First release: 2006 - Christopher O'Riley leak

9. Grand Mal

Version: Only released version ("Fast version")
Recording Session: Mar. - Apr. 1998 - Sunset Sound/Sound Factory in Los Angeles, CA
First release: Unknown leak

10. No Confidence Man
Version: 1994 - Split with Pete Krebs version
Recording Session: Aug. 14 1994 - Sam and Janet Coomes' Home in Portland, OR
First release: 1994 - Split with Pete Krebs

11. Misery Let me Down
Version: Only released version
Recording Session: 1997 - WMCU studio session on Third Rail Radio, College Park, MD
First release: 2011 leak

12. Instrumental (Waltz #3)

Version: Only released version
Recording Session: Jan. 1998 - Februray 1998 - Jackpot! Studio in Portland, OR
First Release: 2004 - Jackpot XO Sessions leak

13. Stickman (Acoustic)
Version: "Version 1 - acoustic - 2002 ES mix"
Recording Session: McConnell Sessions, Satellite Park Studios, Malibu, CA, 2001-2002
First release: 2005 - Silverstevie leak

14. Ceclila-Amanda

Version: Only released version
Recording Session: Mid 1997 - Jan. 1998 - Jackpot! Studio in Portland, OR
First release: 2009 - Kill Rock Stars web release

15. You Make It Seem Like Nothing
Version: Live version
Recording Session: Sep. 21 1996 - Live at Impala Cafe in Los Angeles, CA
First release: 2004 - Confusion leak

16. My New Freedom
Version: 2017 - Either/Or Expanded Live
Recording Session: Jul. 15 1997 - Yo Yo A Go Go Festival in Olympia, WA
First release: 2004 - Confusion leak

17. Everything’s Ok
Version: Only released version
Recording Session: May 2001 - Spring 2002 - Satellite Park in Malibu, CA
First release: 2009 - Silverstevie leak

18. Sorry My Mistake
Version: Live version
Recording Session: Nov. 29 1998 - Live 2 Meter Sessions, Amsterdamn, The Netherlands
First release: Unknown leak

19. Stained Glass Eyes
Version: Only released version
Recording Session: Aug. 1999 - Sunset Sound in Los Angeles, CA
First release: 2006 - Place Pigalle Demos leak

20. No More
Version: Only released version
Recording Session: Mid 1995 - Mid 1996 - Heatmiser House in Portland, OR
First release: 2004 - Either/Or Sessions Demo CD leak

21. Trouble (Cat Stevens Cover)
Version: 2005 - Thumbsucker Soundtrack version
Recording Session: 2001 - Jon Brion Two Beers & Everybody Sings in Los Angeles, CA
First release: 2005 - Thumbsucker Soundtrack version

22. Figure 8
Version: Only released version
Recording Session: Jul. - Aug. 1999 - Capitol Recording in Los Angeles, CA
First release: 2000 - Son of Sam Single



Violent Girl:
1. Division Day
Version: 1997 - Single version
Recording Session: 1996 - Elliott's House in Portland, OR
First release: 1997 - Division Day Single

2. Some (Rock) Song
Version: 1997 - To All The URLs I've Loved Before Compilation
Recording Session: Mar. - Jul. 1996 - The Shop in CA
First release: 1997 - To All The URLs I've Loved Before Compilation

3. A Living Will
Version: 2000 - Single version
Recording Session: Oct. 1998 - Abbey Road in London, England
First release: 2000 - Son of Sam Single

4. How to Take a Fall
Version: 1998 - Waltz #2 (XO) Single
Recording Session: Mar. - Jul. 1996 - The Shop in CA
First release: 1998 - Waltz #2 (XO) Single

5. Dancing on the Highway
Version: "2004 Rob Schnapf mix"
Recording Session: May 2001 - Spring 2002 - Satellite Park in Malibu, CA
First release: 2009 - Silverstevie leak

6. Suicide Machine
Version: Only released version
Recording Session: Oct. 19-20 2003 - New Monkey in Van Nuys, CA
First release: 2009 - Basement Tapes Unfinished/Suppressed leak
 
7. I Figured You Out
Version: 2017 - Either/Or Expanded Remaster
Recording Session: 1995 - Heatmiser House in Portland, OR
First release: 2017 - Either/Or Expanded

8. I Can't Answer You Anymore
Version: 2000 - 3 Titres Inedits promo
Recording Session: 1999 - Sunset Sound in Los Angeles, CA
First release: 2000 - 3 Titres Inedits promo

9. Abused
Version: "Fritz Michaud mix"
Recording Session: Mar. - Jul. 1996 - The Shop Studio, CA
                                Jun. 24 1996 - Heatmiser House in Portland, OR
                                1996 - Elliott's House, Portland, OR
First release: 2004 - Either/Or Sessions Demo CD leak

10. Flowers for Charlie

Version: Live version
Recording Session: Apr. 13 1999 - Live at DV8, Salt Lake City, UT
First release: Concert bootleg

11. Miss Misery
Version: 1997 - Good Will Hunting Soundtrack
Recording Session: 1997 - Unknown studio session
First release: 1997 - Good Will Hunting Soundtrack

12. Our Thing (Instrumental)
Version: 1998 - Waltz #2 (XO) Single
Recording Session: Jun. 1998 - Sonoma Recorders in Los Angeles, CA
First release: 1998 - Waltz #2 (XO) Single

13. Stickman
Version: "Version 2, mix 1 - synth and reversed drums - 2002 ES mix"
Recording Session: Jan. 2003 - Oct. 2003 - New Monkey in Van Nuys, CA
First release: 2005 - leak

14. The Enemy Is You
Version: 1998 - Baby Britain Single
Recording Session: Mar. 1996 - May 1996 - Elliott's House in Portland, OR
First release: 1998 - Baby Britain Single

15. Mr. Goodmorning
Version: "Elliott October 2003 rough mix"
Recording Session: May 2001 - Spring 2002 - Satellite Park in Malibu, CA
First release: Elliott Smith/Jennifer Chiba 10-20-2003 Mix CD

16. Brand New Game

Version: Abbey Road version
Recording Session: Oct. 1998 - Abbey Road in London, England
First release: 2006 - Place Pigalle Demos leak

17. From the Poisoned Well
Version: Only released version
Recording Session: Jan- 2003 - Oct. 2004 - New Monkey in Van Nuys, CA
First release: 2006 - Basement II Demos leak

18. The Real Estate (The Mailman Thinks Me Dumb)
Version: 2011 - Live from Nowhere Near You, Vol. 2 Compilation
Recording Session: Mar. - Jul. 1996 - Elliott Home in Portland, OR
First release: 2011 - Live from Nowhere Near You, Vol. 2 Compilation

19. Burned Out, Still Glowing
Version: Only released version
Recording Session: 1996 - Elliott's Home in Portland, OR
First release: Unknown leak

20. No Life
Version: Only released version
Recording Session: 1999 - Capitol Recording in Los Angeles, CA
First release: 2006 - Place Pigalle Demos leak

21. Splitsville
Version: "Southlander DVD edit"
Recording Session: Aug. 3 2000 - Jackpot! studio sessions, Portland, OR
First release: 2001 in Southlander film

22. Because (Beatles Cover)

Version: 1999 - American Beauty Soundtrack
Recording Session: 1999 - Captiol Recording in Los Angeles, CA
First release: 1999 - American Beauty Soundtrack



 

Check out my other posts on Elliott Smith:

Elliott Smith - The Miser of Heat

Elliott Smith Rarities Archive